Irish Settlement at Bulla Victoria Australia

Bulla Bridge over Deep Creek built 1869
Bulla Bridge over Deep Creek built 1869

Bulla Bridge built 1869 crosses Deep Creek. The town of Bulla is situated in a valley along Deep Creek, a tributary of the Maribyrnong River. In 1861 there were 136 people in the Bulla census, in 1891 there were 306 and in 1933 there were 174.

 

The area in Bulla, Victoria, Australia where the Fanning family from Thurles Co Tipperary Ireland settled in the 1840’s was established almost entirely by Irish families.

In the Hume City Council website under heritage citations the former McAuliffe Farm is described “as one of the farms established by Irish families along the Deep Creek at Wildwood, a precinct settled almost entirely by this ethnic group.” The McAuliffes were one of a group of families of Irish origin, which included the Cahills, Ryans, Feehans, Branigans, and (later)the Fannings and Dillons, who established farms in the “Wildwood” area in the nineteenth century, mostly overlooking the grand valley of Deep Creek. The only known non-Irish family in the Wildwood locality was that of David Patullo, originally of Scotland, who established Craig Bank, later Willow Bank(qv.),near the Wildwood Bridge.”

Willow Bank was the home of the Dillons. The Dillons were from Sth Tipperary, most likely from Clonpet Parish. There is a Margaret Dillon at Clonpet. Also at Solohead Graveyard (about 13kms from Clonpet) there is a grave of a Martin Dillon who died 26/2/1843 aged 62. His spouse is a Margaret. I wonder if this could be Margaret Crowe the mother of Martin Dillon Snr?

The Ryans and the Fannings were both from Thurles, Co Tipperary. The Cahills and the Feehans were also from Co Tipperary. Thomas Branigan came from Cullen in Co.Louth and the McAuliffe family was from Co. Limerick.

These families were also connected through marriage. Mary (Daisy) Dillon married William Patrick Fanning, Mary Ryan married James Feehan and Martin Cahill was married to Mary McAuliffe.

History of Bulla Victoria Australia Published 1910

This is the essay which won the second prize at the Bulla Horticultural Show in 1910 and was written by Frank Cleary and published in the Sunbury News Aug 6 1910:

” HISTORY OF BULLA FORMERLY BULLA BULLA

Bulla is a pretty little village, situated on the banks of a clear stream called Deep Creek. In the year 1850 there were very few houses in Bulla- mostly all tents. A police station was opposite Mr Hillary’s house. The constable Mr Talty, was very clever with a sword. Where Mr Honan is living now was known as the “Trooper’s Bend”, as the police horses used to graze on it.

There was a pound yard on the main road. The first poundkeeper, Mr Gilbert, was the father of John Gilbert, the bushranger. The first blacksmiths and wheelwrights were Campbell and Stewart, who had their dwelling and shop in Trap-street, where Mr Allen now resides.

The price of cutting a tyre was 1 pound and for mending a bullock yoke 5 shillings. Mr Stewart removed to Lancefield, and Mr Hall started business in his place. There was one hotel, the Deep Creek Inn, owned by Tulip Wright; he was owner of much land. In the early days he had a boat, and when the creek was too high to cross otherwise, he rowed people across for 5 shillings each way. He also held church service on part of his premises before the church was built. In 1850 the Church of England was built. Mrs Green gave the land. In the following year the Presbyterian Church was built. The first school was on the main road. It was opened in the year 1854. The teacher was a Mr Lazarus. The second school was in Trap-street. The third move was opposite the Deep Creek Inn. First taught by Mr Lazarus, then Miss Thorpe, Mr Freeman, Mrs Cox, Mr Cassidy and Mr Saunders, in succession. The present school was built in 1871, and in the year 1877 the old school was burned down.

In the year 1850 a post office and store were opened in Trap-street by Messrs Smith and Duff. Mr Smith was a son-in-law of Tulip Wright. Mr Bethell had the first contract for the carrying of the mails, and he afterwards bought the store and post office from Mr Smith.

The first newspaper to Bulla was the “Argus”. The price was sixpence.

The Kaolin works were in full swing for many years(in the end of the ’50’s and early in the ’60’s) and over 40 men were employed. In March, 1860,a flood destroyed the works for a time; but they started again in 1868. For many miles around the district it was a great wheat-growing country. Men were employed in cutting the crops with scythes and reaphooks. They used long handle rakes to rake up the crop. My grandfather, Mr O’Brien, reaped and cradled oats on Mr Dicken’s Coldingham Lodge farm (owner), and occupied by the Dickens family for over half a century. There was one butcher, Mr.Dean. He had a slaughter yard on his property. He was a famous shot. He was known to shoot a bullock over his shoulder while his horse was galloping with a bullock giving chase.

Bulla is a very hilly country in parts. The cutting on the Bulla hill was made in the year 1862. Mr Falvy was the contractor. Previous to that the bullock teams crossed the hill where the quarry now is, then known as the “Gluepot Hill”, from the many teams stuck in crossing.

Another short lived industry was the flour mill, which worked for a few years, but closed in 1861. It was built by Mr Hunter and the miller was Mr Straughan. The ruins of the mill still stand by the creek in Lockton.

The first council meeting was held in the Deep Creek Inn in the year 1862. The first secretary was Mr Sutherland; then Mr Harris, who absconded with about 500 pounds of the council’s money; next Mr Daniel, Mr Lethbridge and our present secretary, Mr Daniel. In the year 1868 the Bulla Shire Hall was built. In 1868 and 1869 the Bulla bridge was made of blue stone taken from the Bulla quarry. Also the Shire Hall and many other buildings.

There were only two blacks in Bulla- Jimmy and Jenny. There was also a family of half casts, called the Brigs.

The first bootmaker was a Mr McDonald.

Bulla was once famous for goats. A crossing is still known as “The Goats”.

The beauty spot of Bulla is “Glenara”, the residence of Alister Clark Esq., with its beautifully laid out gardens and flowers. “Glenara” has been the residence of the Clarke family for more than half a century.

In the early ’50’s a gold mine was struck on Mr Batty’s Red Stone Hill farm. There has been a good yield of gold taken from it, and it is still working.

To the east of Bulla,from Lockton to the Inverness Hotel, was all a forest of trees. In later years it was selected and cut up for farming purposes.

A big flood occurred in the year 1870, and washed away the Wildwood bridge. The Catholic church was built in 1876. There have been a good many people drowned in the Deep Creek.

An omnibus used to run from Bulla to Melbourne. The fare was 5 shillings, and in after years a cab took the place of the bus. Bulla was a flourishing township before the railway to Bendigo was opened, the bullock waggons carting from Melbourne to Bendigo passing through it. Previous to the stone bridge there was a wooden bridge, and before that was built the bullock teams used to cross by a ford. Mobs of wild cattle used to pass through on their way to Melbourne.

Brick works were started in 1877, as Mr Gillies had promised a railway, and 18,000 bricks were made. Carting was too dear to continue, and as there was no railway, the bricks were carted away in the following year to the chemical works, and thus another chance for the township to rise again was lost.

Many people were buried in the township -some close to the creek and others close to Trap-street- before the present cemetery was made. There was a small one opposite the Deep Creek Inn which had to be closed when  the road was getting made.

The Burke and Wills’ party passed through Bulla on their way to Cooper’s Creek.

Native cats and opossums were plentiful some years ago. There were more fish in the Deep Creek then than at the present time. The Recreation Hall was built a few years ago. The industry of Bulla at present is farming and dairying.

On the creek just below where the present school is situated is a swinging bridge which has often been wrecked by floods. There have been many floods in the Deep Creek, but the highest was in December, 1906.”

The Enmore Cork Ireland to Port Phillip Victoria Australia 1841

Enmore 1841 William and Mary Fannin
Passengers on the Enmore from Cork Ireland to Port Phillip Victoria Australia 1841

The ‘Enmore’ was a 281 ton barque that departed Cork, Ireland on 9 June 1841 with 107 people on board.

Cork Queenstowm Harbor
Queenstown Harbour Cork

It left from Cobh (pronounced “Cove”) County Cork. Cobh was renamed Queenstown to honour the Queen Victoria’s visit to Ireland in 1849. It was, however, changed back to Cobh after Irish Independence in 1920. This was the last time and place William and Catherine Fanning stood on Irish soil and the last time they saw their families. They died in Bulla, Victoria, Australia and did not return to Ireland.

The captain was James Henry Ellis and the ship’s doctor Robert Gordon Coombe. First Mate was James William Smith.

In Ireland, the Agent was expected to select only suitable people who came either as married or single, with ages under 40, and each had to have a Certificate from their home parish attesting their status.

All the passengers were brought out by the importer, James Cain, of Melbourne. The Importer was the one who collected the Bounty Immigrants for departure.  Fares(bounty) were 19 pounds. This is the equivalent of about $3,436 in today’s money. There was one death but no births on the voyage.

The introduction of the Bounty System enabled many people from Ireland, as well as from England and Scotland, to migrate to Australia. During the 1830’s and 1840’s almost half of all assisted migrants were of Irish origin. The emigration figures for 1841 show that of the people who arrived in Australia there were 4,563 English, 1,616 Scottish, and 13,400 Irish.

1841 has been called “The Great Year for Immigration to Australia”. This year saw the largest influx of immigrants to Australia before the Gold Rushes. The Irish immigrants mostly came from the South of Ireland. Convict transportation ceased in 1841,the new colonies needed labour and land sales were high.Revenue from land sales was used to pay the fares(bounties) of immigrants to the colonies. 1841 is the first year that Australia competed with America and Canada as a destination for immigrants. Between 1840-41 assisted immigration to Australia trebled.

There were 18 families, 35 single females and 25 single males. Of the 96 adults 15 could read and write, 32 could read and 49 could neither read or write.94 were Catholic and 9 were Protestant. One person, Mr Noukes Bartin, paid his own fare.

The “Enmore” arrived in Port Phillip on the 4th of October 1841 after a three month journey. On board were my ancestors William Patrick Fanning (listed as Fannin) and his wife Catherine Hayes (listed as Mary Fannin). They were married in Cork before emigrating. Both came from Co Tipperary, with William being born in Thurles Parish.

Tipperary passengers on the Enmore:

William Boyle, age 26, farm servant, RC. His wife is Winifred, age 25, farm servant, RC, both could neither read or write.

Thomas Burke, age 22, farm servant, RC, and his wife Biddy age 22, farm servant, both could read and write.

Patrick, 27, and Biddy, 32, Crow, farm servants, RC, Patrick can read but Biddy can neither read or write.

Michael, 32, and Catherine, 32, Dwyer, farm servants, RC, can both read and write.

Michael ,24, and Margaret, 24, Cleary, farm servants, RC, both can read and write.

Wiliam, 28, and Mary,24, Fannin, farm servants, RC, William can read, Mary can do neither. These are my ancestors who settled at Bulla in Victoria.

Michael Barret, 29, labourer, RC, could neither read or write.

William Hanly, 22, labourer, RC, neither read or write.

William O’Donnell, 22, labourer, RC, Could read and write, unmarried.

Michael Quilk, 22, labourer, RC , could neither read or write.

Connor Ryan 32 farm servant, wife Biddy 26 farm servant daughters Johanna 6 and Catherine 1 and a half RC can read & write Co Tipperary.

John Ryan, 28, labourer, RC, Could neither read or write, unmarried.

Patrick Reid, 22, labourer, RC, neither read or write, unmarried.

Alexander Ryan 26, labourer, RC, neither read or write, unmarried.

Patrick Ryan, 19, labourer, RC, neither read or write, unmarried.

John Ryan, 23,labourer, RC, neither read or write, unmarried.

Ann Brohan 28, house servant, RC, neither read or write, unmarried.

Honora Canty, 26, house servant, RC, neither read or write, unmarried.

Mary Cormack, 26, house servant, RC, neither read or write, unmarried.

Catherine Carroll, 25, house servant, RC, neither read or write, unmarried.

Catherine Handley, 23, house servant, Protestant, unmarried.

Johanna Murphy, 27, house servant, RC, reads, unmarried.

Catherine Quirk, 21, house servant, RC, reads and writes, unmarried.

Mary Ryan, 19, house servant, RC, reads, unmarried.

Biddy Ryan, 19, house servant, RC, reads, unmarried.

Mary Ryan, 22, house servant, RC, reads, unmarried.

Mary Ryan, 21, house servant, RC, reads, unmarried.

The other passengers on the Enmore were:

Michael Burke 27, farm servant, his wife Margaret 28,farm servant, and their 8mth old daughter, Catherine.RC. can read and write. From Co Limerick

James Connor 28, farm servant and his wife, Eliza 22, farm servant, neither read nor write. From Co Cork

Christopher Dunn 28 and wife Ellen 20,farm servants. RC, neither read nor write Co Cork

Thomas Evans 24 and wife 22(not named), farm servants. Protestant. Can read and write. Co Wicklow

Denis Gurney 26 and Betty 25,farm servants, and their daughter Mary 2 and a half RC can read and write Co Cork

Mathew Leary 32 and his wife Johanna 33 farm servants. Their daughters Johanna 5 and Betty 8mos RC can neither read nor write Co Limerick

Thomas Norman 30, Smith and his wife Biddy 28,housekeeper and their son John 3 and a half RC neither read nor write Co Waterford

Martin O’Keeffe 21 labourer and wife Judith 20 housemaid RC can read & write Co Clare

John Ryan 24 farm servant and his wife Biddy 26 also a farm servant RC both can read Co Clare

Michael Sheelan(Sheehan?) 24 farm servant and his wife Margaret 20 RC can read & write Co Clare

Thomas Welch 26 farm servant and his wife Ellen 25 farm servant,RC,neither read nor write Co Cork

John Cross 28 Labourer RC neither read nor write Co Limerick

Michael Costigan 24, labourer RC, neither read nor write Queen’s Co

Denis Costigan 27, Labourer RC neither read nor write Queen’s Co

James Denworth 24, labourer RC neither read nor write Co Clare

Timothy Denworth 23, labourer,RC neither read nor write Co Clare

Timothy Donoghie(?) 21 labourer RC can read & write Co Cork

John Dunn 20 labourer RC can read & write Co Cork

David Doolan 25 labourer RC can read & write Co Cork

William Hackett 25 Labourer RC neither read nor write Queen’s Co

Patrick Kirby 20 labourer RC reads and writes Co Cork

John Mansfield 20 labourer RC reads and writes Co Cork

John O’Brien 22 labourer RC neither reads nor writes Co Cork

George Pratt 23 labourer RC neither reads nor writes Queen’s Co

Barny Ryley 23 labourer RC neither reads nor writes Co Cavan

John Sullivan 21 labourer RC neither reads nor writes Co Cork

Morris Trahy 22 labourer RC neither reads nor writes Co Limerick

Edmund Welsh 26 labourer RC neither reads nor writes Co Cork

Patrick Kirby was sent by Mr La Trobe on the 8th Dec 1841 for admission into the Lunatic Asylum

Catherine Bourke 21 House Servant RC neither read nor write Co Limerick

Margaret Bourke 23 House Servant RC neither read nor write Co Limerick

Grace Costigan 20 house servant RC neither read nor write Queen’s Co

Rose Clayton 24 house servant RC neither read nor write Co Cavan

Margaret Cantlin 25 House servant RC neither read nor write Co Limerick

Ann Doolan 19 house servant RC neither read nor write Co Cork

Mary Farrell 20 House servant,RC neither read nor write Queen’s Co

Catherine Fitzwilliam 23 House servant,Protestant reads Dublin

Ellen Hayes 22 house servant Protestant reads and writes Co Cork

Honora Hyde 18 house servant RC reads and writes Co Cork

Margaret Hussey 21 House servant Protestant reads and writes Co Cavan

Biddy Hyde 15 house servant RC reads and writes Co Cork

Betty Hyde 16 house servant RC reads and writes Co Cork

Mary Kennedy 20 house servant RC reads Co Clare

Mary Kirley 21 house servant RC reads and writes Co Cork

Ann Lynch 23 house servant RC neither reads nor writes Co Cork

Ellen Maxwell 16 house servant RC reads Co Cork

Mary O’Brien 18 house servant RC neither reads nor writes Co Cork

Jane O’Leary 19 house servant RC neither reads nor writes Co Cork

Aphros Pratt 20 house servant Protestant can read and write Queen’s Co

Margaret Pratt 16 house servant Protestant reads and writes Queen’s Co

Biddy Shean(Sheehan?) 21 house servant RC reads Co Clare

Jane Smith 18 house servant Protestant reads Co Clare

Margaret Yersley 20 House servant RC reads Co Cork

The Enmore left Melbourne, with Captain Ellis,on Feb 2 1842 for London, with 1150 bales of wool and 2150 bullock horns.