Fanning and Darmody Tithe Payers and Defaulters 1815-1837, Co Tipperary Ireland

Fannings and Darmodys of Co Tipperary Ireland who paid tithes between 1815 and 1837 and those who in 1831 defaulted on the payment of tithes.

Tithes (meaning a tenth) were levies collected in support of a church, which could be a single church or all churches of one faith. In Ireland from the 1500s to the 1800s, tithes were taxes on the agricultural system to support the Church of Ireland. Tithes made everyone cross, for many reasons. Those who were Catholic or Presbyterian resented the contribution to the established church. Land proprietors resented the impact of tithes on rents.

Tithes existed in Ireland as long ago as the 1100s, giving support to monasteries. The system that came to be resented so much was formalized in law in 1541. In 1736 legislation exempted pasture from the calculation so the burden fell upon farmers who cultivated the soil. Not all tithes went to the Church of Ireland; in 1832 a little over 15% went to “lay” (non-religious) tithe owners who acquired the right to collect tithes at the dissolution of the monasteries.

By the early 1800s resentment had become very serious. Tithes had been part of the cause of rural unrest in the late 1700s; in the 1830s, the disruptions came to be called the Tithe War. The campaign against tithes began in County Kilkenny and spread quickly to other counties. By 1833, more than half the tithes due in 22 counties had not been paid. Many landowners supported non-payment because legislation of 1823 restored pastureland to the calculation. The resistance became violent, and some deaths occurred among protestors and police.

Faced with an impossible situation, the authorities stopped trying to enforce payment and clergymen without income could apply for relief. In 1838 the tithe ceased to be paid by occupiers and landlords were levied a “rent charge.” The problem completely disappeared at the disestablishment of the Church of Ireland (1869).

The Tithe Composition Act, passed in 1823, set out the process by which the tithe was converted to a monetary payment due twice a year. Property value was assessed, meetings were held in parishes, and records made of all those who were to make the payments. These are the Tithe Applotment Books.

At the time of the Tithe War any clergyman applying for relief was required to report on the situation in his parish including the names of all those who had failed to pay–the tithe defaulters. Lists of roughly 30,000 defaulters survive. ” From Ancestry.com article by Sherry Irvine

Fanning, Fannin & Darmody Entries in the Co Tipperary Tithe Applotment Books : A-R-P = Acres, Rods & Perches (Irish) H, O, L, G = House, Office, Land, Garden.

Ballymurreen Civil Parish 1827, Thurles Poor Law Union:  Joseph Fanning, Parkstown .

Bruis Civil Parish 1832: Robert Fanning of Mount Bruis Townland.

Cordangan Civil Parish 1835: John Fannin of Lacken.

Fertiana Civil Parish 1825:  Richard Fannin, Turtulla ,  Widow Fannin, Turtulla .

Civil Parish of Inch  William Fannin, my ancestor who is buried in Ballycahill Cemetery.

Tithe Applotment Book Lissaroon Wm Fannin
Tithe Applotment Book entry for Lissaroon in Inch Parish

Civil Parish of Inch Widow Burke alias Fannin

Parish of Kilfithmone – 1823-1824 Philip Darmody,  Ballinlonty, Land 1 acre1 perch; Catherine Darmody, Land 1 acre; Catherine Darmody, House, Office, Land 10 acres, 2 perches; Philip Darmody,  House, Office, Land {21/3/27} 10 acres, 2 perches.

1826-Darby? Darmody Fishmoyne, Wm Darmody Ballinlonty, Wm Darmody Ballinlonty.

1834-1837 Daniel Darmody Kilfithmone, William Darmody Kilfithmone.

Civil Parish of Kilmurry 1834: Patrick Fanning Ballinamona Townland.

Parish of Knockgraffon 1826 : Patrick (Mary) Fanning of Loughkent, William Fanning of Donegal.

Parish of Loughmore West April 1827: Michael Darmody Ballybrista,  Denis Darmody Killahara,  Philip Darmody Killahara, Edward Fanning Carraig-Loughmore,  John Fanning Clondoty.

Loughmore East of River Suir: Edw. Darmody Graiguefrehane, Nicholas Fanning Graiguefrehane,  Michael Fanning Killenleigh.

Parish of Loughmore East otherwise Callabegs Earl of Carrick April 1825: John Fanen Gurthreagh, Patrick Fanen Skeogh, Patrick. Fanen Skeogh.

Civil Parish of Mora 1824: John Fanning of Ballanattin Upper.

Parish of Moyaliff 1837 : John Fanning, Rossmult.

Moycarky Civil Parish 1829:  Joseph Fannin, Drumgower, Lawrence Fannin, Graigue, William Fannin, Graigue,  William Fannin Kilnoe.

Civil Parish of Moyne 1828: James Fanning of Moyne Temple, James Fanning of Lisdonolly.

Civil Parish of Nenagh 1828: Ned Fanning of Spout Road.

Tithe Applotments Roscrea Civil Parish, no date given:Ml Darmody Killavilla, Ml Darmody  Killavilla, Ml Darmody Benaghmore District, Pierce Darmody, Pierce Darmody Benaghmore District , Pierce Darmody Carrick ,  Pierce Darmody Killavilla, Edwd Fanning Big Matt House District,  Patt Fanning Ballychary, Patt Fanning Streamstown.

Parish of Templeree c 1823: John Fanin Gurtadanagan

Civil Parish of Templtouhy 1815-1821: Richard Fanning of Lisdaleen

Tithe Applotment Entries 1833, Thurles Civil Parish: Casontown ? Edward Fanning, Brittas Road or North West Suburb, James Fanning Casontown, John Fanning Knockroe, John Fanning Tooreen, Michael Fanning Castle Hounie?, Michael Fanning Commons, Patk Fanning Bawntameena, Pat Fanning?, Bawntameena, Pat Fanning?

Parish of Upperchurch c 1829/30: Jeremiah Darmody Moher.

Tithe Defaulters

Civil Parish of Inch: Edmond Fannin, farmer, Townland of Buckley Islands, 1831

Widow Burke alias Fannin, farmer, Inch, 1831

Edmond Callanan & John Cullinan, Upper Dovea.

Townland of Lissaroon: John Cormac,  Patrick Banan, William Purcell, William Carroll, Patrick Ryan, William Fannin, farmer, Thomas Cormac, Edmond Purcell, John Purcell, William Purcell, Walter Purcel.

Civil Parish of Kilfithmone: Daniel Darmody 1831  Fishmoyne, William Darmody Ballinlonty 1831.

Civil Parish of Kilmurry1831, Patrick Fanning, farmer, Ballynamona .

Civil Parish of Thurles 1831: Michael Fanning, farmer, Thurles; Patrick Fanning, farmer, Thurles; Patrick Fanning, farmer, Seskin; John Fanning, farmer, Seskin; Michael Fanning, farmer, Leighmore (Loughmore?); Oliver Fanning, farmer, Race Course; Michael Fanning, farmer, Toureen.

Civil Parish of Moycarkey 1831: William Fannin farmer, Kilno; Joseph Fannin, farmer, Drumgour; William Fannin, farmer, Grague.

These  records came from The IrelandGenWeb Project and ancestry.com.

Fannings in The Hearth Money Rolls 1665 to 1667 Co Tipperary Ireland

The names of Fannings in the Hearth Money Rolls of 1665-67 Co Tipperary Ireland. These lists consist of the names of householders who paid the hearth tax introduced in 1662 which was a tax of two shillings for every fire, heath or stove.

The Hearth Money Rolls “contain the muster roll of the inhabitants of Tipperary five years after the restoration of Charles II and thirteen years after the surrender of the last organised Irish forces. The Hearth Money Tax was introduced soon after the return of Charles II as it afforded a convenient instrument for extracting the last farthing from a defeated race.” (Thomas Laffan).

The Bishop of Cashel and Emly, Rev. Dr. Thomas Fennelly wrote an introduction to Thomas Laffan’s “Hearth Money Records” and this is part of what he wrote:

” They are intstructive in this – that they bear testimony to a remarkable historical fact, illustrating the tenacity with which the Irish people clung to the soil of their native land, in spite of the repeated efforts of the Invader to allienate them from it.

These lists were drawn up less than twenty years after the slaughter connected with the Cromwellian war, and the clearances effected by the Cromwellian Settlement, and the wonder is that any Irish names appear on them. But, singular to relate, the vast majority of the names are those of the native Irish. In the Cromwellian Settlement the Irish Inhabitants, except a few of the labouring class, were ordered to depart to Connaught, where possessions were assigned to them in lieu of those from which they were expelled, and their former holdings were parcelled out amongst the Cromwellian soldiers and adventurers. In this way the whole of the County Tipperary was taken from its lawful owners, and carefully allotted to English and Scotch settlers, proportionately to the nature of the services rendered, or the money subscribed to the expenses of the war.

The names of the new occupiers are given at length in “Prendergast’s Cromwellian Settlement” and, comparing them with these lists, it can be seen that the Cromwellian soldiers and adventurers had almost entirely disappeared in the brief interval, and the Tipperarymen were back again in the homes of their ancestors. The short tenure of these merciless plunderers can be attributed mainly to the following causes:-First, they were unused to farming, and therefore they had neither the skill nor the industry which was essential to the successful cultivation of the soil. Secondly, they were located on separate portions of land, and in that way they became easy prey to those dashing spirits, who did not go to Connaught, but took to the mountains and the bogs, whence they made nightly incursions into the neighbouring farms, and abstracted from them cattle and corn and other portable goods. This annoyance was too much for the late comers, and to avoid it they sold out their goods and departed. Thirdly, many of the Cromwellian landlords kept the native Irish as tenants, irrespective of the law of Transportation. To these may be added sevearl minor causes, amongst them being the protection of the Ormonde family, which regained its ascendancy after the stormy times had passed away. But, notwithstanding all explanation, it is very singular that  plot designed and executed with such systematic care should have completely failed in so short a period, and that the native Irish were back again on the soil that belonged to them by the Law of Nations and by immemorial Right.”

The Hearth Money Act 1662 provided that there was to be a tax of two shillings “for every fire, hearth, or other place used for fireing and stoves ” (Laffan). The rolls consist of the names of householder who paid the hearth tax, it is arranged on a county, parish and townland basis.

Tipperary is almost unique in the Irish counties in having her rolls complete.

1665 Baronia de Middle Third:

Parochia de Drangan: Edmond Fanning 1hearth 2 shillings.

1666-1667 Barony of Middlethird:

Parish of Drangan:

Morrish Fanning, Ballynenaine 1h 2s, Edmond Fanninge Newtowne 1h, Edmond Faninge Preistowne 1h;

Parishes of Clonoone, Coolemududy and St Augustine: Ballyhomack: Edmond Fanninge Ballynad 1h

Baronia de Elliogurty and Ikyryn:

Parochia de Borresliegh and Ballyomurrine: David Faning 1h 2s; Thos. Faning 1h 2s.

Parish of Bourny: Thomas Fanninge Lughmockerock 1h 2s.

Baronia de Slieverdagh and Comasy:

Parochia de Kyllenayle: Thomas Fanning, Kylleny 1h 2s.

Parochia de Ballyngarry:

Geoffry Faning, Ballyngarry, 2h 4s.

Glangall and Beallaghboy Villages: David Fanning de Fearanrory 1h 2s. John Faning, Ballynsagirt 1h 2s. Thos. Faning, Ballynsagirt 1h 2s.

Gortfree and Garrynagree Villages: William Faning de Kyllmokenage 1h 2sGeffry Faning 1h 2s

Parochia de Lishmallyn: James Faninge Ikyrn 1h 2s. Island and Gragagh Villages: Richard Faning 1h 2s,

Baronia de Owney and Arrar:

Parochia de Killvelan: Lawrence Faning, de hills 1h 2s

Parish of Killvelane Lawrence Fanning Towlo 2h and an oven.

Barony of Clanwilliam:

Parish of Clony Pett  Jeoffry Fanning, Breanshae and Ballynuntye 1h

Barony of Slevardagh:

Parish of Bowlicke: Nicholas Fannyng, Clonamicon 1h, Jeoffrey Fanning,Esquire, Ballingarry, 3h,an oven and a kilne 10s, Thomas Fanninge 1h Ballintaggart, Thomas Fanning, Cappah, 1h

Parish of Lismalin Richard Fanninge, Mohubbur, 2h 4s, Mary Fanninge, Mohubbur, 1h 2s

Parish of Killinainvan and Modeshello: Jeoffrey Fannyng, Ballyvadlea 1 h 2s

Barony of  Owney and  Arrar:

Parish of Bourney Thomas Fanninge Lughmockerock 1h,

Parish of Killevelane (in Owny) Lawrence Fanning, Towloe, 2h and an oven, 6s.

The Hearth Money Rolls for 1665-6-7 online free at Ask About Ireland.

Fanning Listings in Penders Census 1659 Co Tipperary Ireland

Fannings listed in Penders Census of Ireland 1659 for Co Tipperary Ireland.

Census of Ireland 1659 was compiled by Sir William Petty and edited by Seamus Pender. It gave the names of those who held title to the land and the total number of persons resident in each townland.

The format was as follows : Parishes, Townlands, Numbers of People Tituladoes Names: Eng. (Scotts) Irish. It gives the names of those who held title to the land and the total number of persons (English and Irish) resident in each townland, it also lists the principal Irish names in each barony and their number. According to Pender the term “Titulado” is best explained as referring to the principal person or persons of standing in any particular locality; such a person could have been of either sex, a nobleman, baronet, gentleman, esquire, military officer, or adventurer. The returns also give the names and numbers of the principal Irish, by barony.

In the Barony of Sleavordagh in Penders’ Census 1659, C0. Tipperary there are 31 Fanninges listed under “Principall Irish Names their Number”. The number of people in this Barony being 307 English and 2101 Irish.

In the Parish of Ballingarry at the place Mohobbur are 23 people and at the place Ballingarry there are 53. The Tituladoes or principal occupiers being Jeffery Fannying Esq and William Fannyng gent.

In the Parish of Killenule at the place Killeens there are 22 people with the tituladoe being Thomas Fannynge gent.

In Middlethird Barony there are 10 Faninges living.

Penders Census 1659 covering Co Tipperary can be viewed on The IrelandGenWeb Project site.

Description of Thurles Co Tipperary Ireland in 1824

A detailed description of Thurles, Co Tipperary, Ireland from Pigot’s 1824 Directory.

In Pigot’s Directory for 1824 Thurles is described as “an ancient and very respectable market town distant from Dublin 70 miles, from Kilkenny, by the mail road, 23 miles, from Limerick 36, and from Clonmel, by the mail road 23 miles.

It is pleasantly situated on the river Suir, and extends on each bank, to the distance of an English mile. The main street is one hundred and ten English perches in length, crosses the river at right angles, from east to west, and forms a large open and regular street, 170 feet wide at the west end, and regularly decreasing to 85 feet at the bridge; on the other side of the river it is 72 feet wide, from the bridge to its eastern extremity; there are also other streets branching from the main street with large and populous suburbs.

An extensive retail trade and much country business are transacted, as the town is surrounded by rich, fertile and populous country. The necessities of life are abundant. Turf bogs in detached situations, and extensive collieries, six miles distant, afford a good supply of fuel.

The ruins of seven castles were to be seen within the last twenty years; there are at present the remains of three, with those of a large mansion , lately the residence of the Landaff family. In 1300 a monastery for Carmalites or White Friars, the tower which still exists, was founded here by the family of Butler.

This town gave the title of Earl to the noble family of Ormond. The public buildings are numerous and respectable. A large and stately sessions house stands in the centre of the town, and in an adjoining street has lately been erected, at the cost of several thousand pounds, a spacious gaol, or bridewell. The church is a small but neat building, with a well inclosed yard, and the chapel, which cost 10,000l. is one of the largest and most handsome structures of the kind in Ireland; the interior is magnificent, and about to receive the valuable addition of an organ.

There are two convents, situated near the chapel. In each of which a great number of poor female children are taught needlework and other useful branches of industry, as also reading and writing.

There is also an establishment of monks, who devote their time to the instructions of four hundred boys, on the Lancastrian system, and the number is daily increasing; this most benevolent institution is solely supported by public subscription.

In the Ursaline Convent a large number of young ladies from Dublin, Cork, and other parts of Ireland, are received as boarders, and instructed on every polite accomplishment. The house is most delightfully situated on the banks of the river Suir, and the gardens are beautifully and tastefully laid out, and enclosed by a wall of moderate height. In this establishment there are twenty nuns, who have a private entrance to a commodious gallery in the chapel, to attend divine service.

The Presentation order are about to erect a superior and commodious place of residence; the present establishment consists of a superioress and seven nuns.

Thurles is rapidly increasing in wealth and importance, and a unanimity and good will exist between all classes of society rarely to be met with. Sessions are held here twice a year, besides weekly petty sessions, at which the resident and neighbouring magistrates preside.

The ruins of the famous abbey of Holy Cross are distant from Thurles three miles on the road to Cashel; they are of the most beautiful and interesting description.The account we have of the origin of this monument of antiquity, is, that Murtough, monarch of Ireland, and grandson of Brien Boru, having received from Pope Pascal II, in 1110, a gift of a piece of the Cross, covered with gold and ornamented with precious stones, determined to found a monastery, and dedicated it to the Holy Cross, which he began but did not live to finish. Donald O’Brien completed the church and abbey in 1169; he was king of North Munster, and his monument is still to be seen.

The market is held on Saturday, and there are fairs on the first Tuesday in very month, on Easter Monday, the 21st of August, and the 21st of December.”

1837 Description of Thurles Co Tipperary Ireland

A description of Thurles town Co Tipperary Ireland by Samuel Lewis 1837.

This description is from the “Topographical Dictionary of Ireland” by Samuel Lewis 1837.

“Thurles is a market and post-town in the province of Munster, 24 3/4 miles north from Clonmel and 75 miles south west from Dublin, on the road from Tipperary to Templemore; containing 10,031 inhabitants, 7,084 of which live in the town of Thurles. This place originally called DurlasO’Fogarty, (Durlas is Gaelic for fort) is of great antiquity and in the 10th century was the scene of a memorable battle between the Danes and the native Irish.

The town is pleasantly situated on the banks of the river Suir, by which it is divided into two nearly equal parts, connected by a low bridge and consists of one spacious street, from each extremity of which smaller streets diverge in various directions. In 1831 it contains 1210 houses.

The surrounding country is extremely fertile and the town is the commercial centre of a populous and highly cultivated district, and is rapidly increasing in wealth and importance. A considerable trade is carried on in corn, which is sent by land carriage to Clonmel: it has also excellent retail trade, and contains a large brewery and a tannery.

The parish comprises 7290 statute acres, of which 5670 are arable, 810 pasture, and 810 bog and waste: the land in cultivation is of very good quality, producing abundant crops,. An abundant supply of fuel is obtained from the bogs and from Slievaedagh coal mines, which are about eight miles distant.”

Fanning Co Tipperary Voters 1839 Ireland

The names of Fanning voters on the Co Tipperary registers for 1839.

Names from the Voter’s registers 1839:

Cashel Division: Robert Fanning Ballinvara

Nenagh Division: William Fannin of Lilsaroon; Patrick Fanning of Thurles; Thomas Fanning of Coldfields.

Source: Jenny Fawcett Land and Leaseholders (this site is no longer online)

Fannings Who Signed the Parnell Testimonial 1883 Co Tipperary Ireland

Joseph and Philip Fanning of Moycarkey signed the Parnell Testimonial in 1883 as did Jeremiah and Patrick Darmody.

The Parnell Testimonial was a national collection taken up by the Irish people in support of Charles Stewart Parnell, the leader of the Irish Home Rule Party.

Joseph Fanning and Philip Fanning, both of Moycarkey-Borris Parish signed the Parnell Testimonial. Jeremiah Darmody of Moycarkey-Borris and Patrick Darmody of Gortnahoe-Glengoole Parish also signed.

These names are from a list of contributors from the Parish of Moycarkey-Borris published in the Tipperary Leader April 18, 1883.

Fanning and Darmody the Cormack Petition 1858 Co Tipperary Ireland

A list of Co Tipperary Fanning and Darmody signatories to the Cormack Petition 1858.

The brothers, Daniel and William Cormack, from Loughmore Co Tipperary were publicly hanged outside Nenagh Gaol on May 11, 1858 after being found guilty of the murder of John Ellis, a land agent in Loughmore.

Daniel and William always maintained that they had played no part in the crime, and they were supported by some 2,357 people who signed a petition protesting the brothers’ innocence. The commonly held view at the time was that a local landlord had shot Ellis in a crime of passion involving Ellis’ sister, and that the Cormack brothers had been framed for murder.

Motivated by growing unease at the convictions and executions, a petition was organized for presentation to Parliament that requested the setting up of an inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the conviction of the Cormack Brothers and into the administration of criminal justice in Ireland generally.

Andrew Darmody Hollyford, Darby Darmody Hollyford, George Darmody Moyne,
John Darmody Holycross, John Darmody Clerihan, Owen Darmody Hollyford, Thomas Darmody Hollyford, Tobias Darmody Hollyford, Jeremiah Darmody signed the petition.

Fannings who signed this petition were Daniel Fanning Thurles, Jeffry Fanning Thurles, William Fanning Thurles, Edward Fanning Drom, John Fanning Drom, Thomas Fanning Drom, Edward (Edmond) Fanning Two-Mile-Borris, Edmond Fanning Two-Mile-Borris, John Fanning New Birmingham, Joseph Fanning Moycarkey, William Fanning Moyne, William Fanning Roscrea, John Fanning Borrisoleigh.

The complete Cormack Petition list.

In 1910 Daniel and William’s remains were removed from Nenagh Gaol and brought home to Loughmore in a major ceremony, with two hearses drawn by plumed horses and followed by huge crowds. After the procession arrived in the village, the Cormack brothers were buried in a large mausoleum in the local churchyard, where people still go to see the original oak coffins and the inscription proclaiming the brothers’ innocence.

Source for this list was from: http://www.censusfinder.com/irish-census-records5.htm

Recently in Loughmore Parish the community there remembered the day in 1910 when the remains of Daniel and William Cormack were brought from Nenagh Gaol to be interred in Loughmore Cemetery.

Loughmore blogspot describes the day and gives background information, newspaper clippings and photos from the day and the past.

Ancestry of Edmund Fanning of Connecticut America 1620 to 1683

An outline of the possible ancestry of Edmund Fanning 1620-1683 Connecticut America.

The following is a post by Jon Fannon (Dec18, 2008 in Ireland Roots Tipperary) where he gives an outline of  what he thinks is the ancestry of Edmund Fanning, the immigrant ancestor of many American Fannings.

Edmund of Conn. line however is : conn. Edmund (b.1620) was son of Francis (b.abt 1588 was a sheriff and mayor in limerick also) and Francis is possibly the brother to Simon fitzClement. (Clement had 3 sons. 1st came Simon, then Edward or Edmund, and 3rd Francis) Edward fitzClement had a son Nicholas who also was sheriff or mayor. Francis fitzClement had two sons Thomas and Edmund. Francis Fanning with Edmund fitzFrancis Fanning and Thomas fitzFrancis Fanning along with Nicholas Fanning are documented forced to leave Limerick to Ballengyre by the English in 1651 or 1653 I c’ant remember right now, and then was again named in some sort of reconciliation from the queen in 1660 I believe. It’s presumed Edmund went on to Conn. sometime after 1653, possibly in 1660. Keep in mind for this hundred year period there was a Fanning as sheriff or mayor in Limerick most of the time. Weather or not it was a cousin a brother a nephew, it seems there were no shortage of Fanning law men, and to complicate this more their names were repeated generation after generation causing a lot of confusion. “

Irish Fanning History from the 12th Century

Early documented Irish Fanning history from 1192.

Arms of the Duke of Normandy

Fanning is an Anglo-Irish or Anglo-Norman surname. It seems that The Irish Fannings were originally Norman knights. They have been referred to as minor Norman knights.

However there are no names similar to Fanning on The Battle Abbey Rolls which can be seen at www.robertsewell.ca/battleabbey.html . This document recorded the Companions of Duke William of Normandy at the Battle of Hastings. They are a combination of all the known Battle Abbey Rolls, including Wace, Dukes, Counts, Barons, Seigneurs who attended William at Hastings. These were the commanders. They were the elite who had provided ships, horses, men and supplies for the venture. They were granted the Lordships.

The list does not include the estimated 12,000, Standard bearers, Men at Arms, Yeomen, Freemen and other ranks, although some of these were granted smaller parcels of England, some even as small as 1/8 th of a knight’s fee.

The Domesday Book was compiled in 1086 and records all land and landholders in England. William needed to know how much wealth he had to fight off the Danes.

The majority of landholders in England at the time of the Domesday Book had accompanied William the Conqueror from France in 1066, and were granted areas of land previously held by English natives. The alphabetized list on the following pages contains brief notes on almost 200 of the most well-known landholders at the time. A complete list can never be drawn up due to fact that many of those mentioned in the Domesday book have vanished into obscurity. While there are no Fannings on it, that I can see, it is still a fascinating document.

The following are references to Fannings in Ireland from 1192:

In 1171 the Anglo-Norman leader Strongbow (Richard de Clare) was created Lord of Leinster by the King of England and initiated land grants to his favourites in exchange for military service as knights. These grants of land were expressed in terms of knights’ fees, with payment due from each tenant-in-chief to their lord, who was accountable to the King of England. His successor in 1192 William Marshall continued this process of land grants. Most of Central Ossory was shared among William’s knights. Galmoy was split among the bishop of Ossory, and the families of BigodDrohullFanynSyward, Archdeacon, and Smith.

The political and social impacts to the native Gaelic septs in Ossory included a gradual replacement of the Irish Brehon tradition of local chiefs, laws and territories with the political structure of the Anglo-Normans which centered itself around the establishment of shires, manors, castles, villages and churches.

Richard Fanyn(Janyn) was among the first of the family in Ireland. He witnessed Geoffrey FitzRobert’s charter in 1204. He was killed fighting on the side of Richard, Earl Marshall in 1234. He may have been the original enfeoffee at Clomantagh in Kilkenny. He was succeeded by his son Thomas who held half the fee of a knight at Glothementhau. In 1300 John Fanyn was lord of Clomantagh. A Henry Fanyn is mentioned probably son of John. In 1317 Thomas de Fanyn (Fannyn) had succeeded to the half knight’s fee at Clohmantagh. He was dead by 1348.

Extracts from the Calendar of Ormond Deeds.I-VI, Edmund Curtis,1932-43:

Circa 1244 John Fanyn is a witness in a claim.

1247 Thomas, son of Richard Fanyn, holds a half knights fee at Glothementhau (From “Knights Fees in Counties Wexford, Carlow and Kilkenny” Dublin stationery Office, 1950.)

Circa 1250 Sir John Fanyn witness

1261 Thomas Fanyn witness

Between 1261-1266 Sir William Fanyn a prominent witness

1284 Walter Fanyn involved in another land dispute

1305 Eustace le Poer, knight, gives the manor of Moyobyra ( including lands, castle, meadows etc) in heredity forever, to William Ffanyng.

1314/1315 Thomas Fanyn holds a half knights’ fee at Cloghmantagh, now Clomantagh(from “Knights’ Fees in Counties Wexford, Carlow and Kilkenny”)

1317 Thomas de Fanyn (Thomas Fannyn) has half a knights’ fee at Cloghmantagh, Clomantagh, barony of Crannagh ( Knights’ Fees in Counties Wexford etc)

1332 John Fanyn witness

1343 Thomas Fanyn mentioned

1410 Henry Fanyn of Moytobry appears in Tipperary court

1430 John Fanyn gives away lands in Haltonwrstoun and Balispedegh

1489 Notorial deed by Thomas Fannyng, lord of Mohobbir, chief of his nation in a legitimacy dispute between himself and William Fannyng tries in the diocese of Cashel. Each claimed to be the legitimate son of Nicholas Fannyng, “once captain of his nation”. Thomas is declared the legitimate son of Nicholas.

1550’s At inquisitions taken at Clonmel are included the names Geoffrey Fanyng, gent.: Nihols, Richard and John Fanyng fitz Geoffrey of BallingarryWilliam Fanyng, gent.; Wilfred Faning of BallyngarinOliver Fanyng, juror; William Fannyng fitz Oliver of Garynegrye, kern; James Fannyng of Garransillaghe, kern; Shane Enellan Fannyng and Maurice Fannyng, late of Cahir, kerns; Richard Fanyng of the CarrickRichard Reagh Fannyng of Balyngary. (A kern was a foot soldier).

1565 Oliver Faning and James Faning of Garrynegrye, County Tipperary, grant to Sir Thomas Butler, Earl of Ormond, the castle of Moylessan . Later voided as it was in mortgage.

1579 Edmund Fanning of Farinrory, Co Tipperary, son of William Fanning grants to Thomas ,Earl of Ormond half the towns of Ballymaclaghne and Ballytarsne in Co Kilkenny or Carlow.

1584/5 A dispute between William Fanyng, son of James Fanyng of Balyclaghin andThomas, the Earl of Ormond over the towns and lands of Ballymclaghin and Ballytarsny, Co Kilkenny. Was divided between William, his uncle Oliver Faninge and the Earl of Ormond.

1592 William Fanning of Ballygary and Edmund Fanning of Faren Rory are mentioned in a commission.

The above notes were taken from an article in Rootsweb by Dennis Walsh.  The Fanning Family Early Documented History

The Cromwellian Protestant Settlement (1650-1690) The arrival of Oliver Cromwell’s army in Kilkenny by 1650, dealt a devastating blow to the Old English (Anglo-Norman Catholic) landed gentry. Following defeat, many families remained on as the tenantry of the county, while others transplanted themselves into Connacht. Of the families which are said to have moved in the 1650’s is that of Giles Fannyng.

Just prior to 1641, the majority of landed proprietors in County Kilkenny were Catholics of Anglo-Norman descent. By the end of the seventeenth century this class had largely been replaced by New English Protestant landlords, many of whom were Cromwellian officers, soldiers and supporters whose pay had been satisfied by land grants. Still a large part of Kilkenny was controlled by the Duke of Ormond and other Butler lands.

The Williamite Ascendancy (1691-1703) By the late 1600’s, the Williamite victory in Ireland was followed by the confiscation of most ‘Jacobite’ estates.

This new landed gentry bore little resemblance to the Ireland envisioned by the Cromwellian land commissioners. The old Catholic order had been destroyed but it had been replaced, not with Protestant yeomanry, but by a handful of powerful Protestant landowners, many of whom were non-residents. Kilkenny’s tenantry remained Catholic, largely Old Irish, as it had been before 1641, but it was augmented by many former Old English proprietors. The Cromwellian commissioners had not intended to lay the basis of a narrow gentry class, but the failure of the majority of Kilkenny’s grantees to take possession or take up residence upon their lands, allowed a small number of enterprising men to gain possession of vast amounts of land. From New English Families in Rootsweb by Dennis Walsh.

1. “The names of all the gentlemen inhabiting the comit’ of Kilkenny, with their lands valued by estimation as followeth.”

Lands holden by knight service of the manor of the Grannaghby………….Manor of Kildenale in the Barony of Slievevardaghe.–James Butler, 60l.; John Cantwell, 10l.; Richard Cantwell, 15l.; Richard Cantwell 6l.; Thomas Stoke, 20l.; James Laffan and his cousin, 30l.; William FitzJames, 3l.; Thomas Butler and his kinsmen, 8l.; Richard Marvell, 15l.; William Fanninge, 50l.; William Faninge, 13l. 6s. 8d.; James Moreis, 5l.–Total, 235l. 6s. 8d.

Source: Calendar of the Carew Manuscripts