Fannings in The Hearth Money Rolls 1665 to 1667 Co Tipperary Ireland

The Hearth Money Rolls “contain the muster roll of the inhabitants of Tipperary five years after the restoration of Charles II and thirteen years after the surrender of the last organised Irish forces. The Hearth Money Tax was introduced soon after the return of Charles II as it afforded a convenient instrument for extracting the last farthing from a defeated race.” (Thomas Laffan).

The Bishop of Cashel and Emly, Rev. Dr. Thomas Fennelly wrote an introduction to Thomas Laffan’s “Hearth Money Records” and this is part of what he wrote:

” They are intstructive in this – that they bear testimony to a remarkable historical fact, illustrating the tenacity with which the Irish people clung to the soil of their native land, in spite of the repeated efforts of the Invader to allienate them from it.

These lists were drawn up less than twenty years after the slaughter connected with the Cromwellian war, and the clearances effected by the Cromwellian Settlement, and the wonder is that any Irish names appear on them. But, singular to relate, the vast majority of the names are those of the native Irish. In the Cromwellian Settlement the Irish Inhabitants, except a few of the labouring class, were ordered to depart to Connaught, where possessions were assigned to them in lieu of those from which they were expelled, and their former holdings were parcelled out amongst the Cromwellian soldiers and adventurers. In this way the whole of the County Tipperary was taken from its lawful owners, and carefully allotted to English and Scotch settlers, proportionately to the nature of the services rendered, or the money subscribed to the expenses of the war.

The names of the new occupiers are given at length in “Prendergast’s Cromwellian Settlement” and, comparing them with these lists, it can be seen that the Cromwellian soldiers and adventurers had almost entirely disappeared in the brief interval, and the Tipperarymen were back again in the homes of their ancestors. The short tenure of these merciless plunderers can be attributed mainly to the following causes:-First, they were unused to farming, and therefore they had neither the skill nor the industry which was essential to the successful cultivation of the soil. Secondly, they were located on separate portions of land, and in that way they became easy prey to those dashing spirits, who did not go to Connaught, but took to the mountains and the bogs, whence they made nightly incursions into the neighbouring farms, and abstracted from them cattle and corn and other portable goods. This annoyance was too much for the late comers, and to avoid it they sold out their goods and departed. Thirdly, many of the Cromwellian landlords kept the native Irish as tenants, irrespective of the law of Transportation. To these may be added sevearl minor causes, amongst them being the protection of the Ormonde family, which regained its ascendancy after the stormy times had passed away. But, notwithstanding all explanation, it is very singular that  plot designed and executed with such systematic care should have completely failed in so short a period, and that the native Irish were back again on the soil that belonged to them by the Law of Nations and by immemorial Right.”

The Hearth Money Act 1662 provided that there was to be a tax of two shillings “for every fire, hearth, or other place used for fireing and stoves ” (Laffan). The rolls consist of the names of householder who paid the hearth tax, it is arranged on a county, parish and townland basis.

Tipperary is almost unique in the Irish counties in having her rolls complete.

1665 Baronia de Middle Third:

Parochia de Drangan: Edmond Fanning 1hearth 2 shillings.

1666-1667 Barony of Middlethird:

Parish of Drangan:

Morrish Fanning, Ballynenaine 1h 2s, Edmond Fanninge Newtowne 1h, Edmond Faninge Preistowne 1h;

Parishes of Clonoone, Coolemududy and St Augustine: Ballyhomack: Edmond Fanninge Ballynad 1h

Baronia de Elliogurty and Ikyryn:

Parochia de Borresliegh and Ballyomurrine: David Faning 1h 2s; Thos. Faning 1h 2s.

Parish of Bourny: Thomas Fanninge Lughmockerock 1h 2s.

Baronia de Slieverdagh and Comasy:

Parochia de Kyllenayle: Thomas Fanning, Kylleny 1h 2s.

Parochia de Ballyngarry:

Geoffry Faning, Ballyngarry, 2h 4s.

Glangall and Beallaghboy Villages: David Fanning de Fearanrory 1h 2s. John Faning, Ballynsagirt 1h 2s. Thos. Faning, Ballynsagirt 1h 2s.

Gortfree and Garrynagree Villages: William Faning de Kyllmokenage 1h 2sGeffry Faning 1h 2s

Parochia de Lishmallyn: James Faninge Ikyrn 1h 2s. Island and Gragagh Villages: Richard Faning 1h 2s,

Baronia de Owney and Arrar:

Parochia de Killvelan: Lawrence Faning, de hills 1h 2s

Parish of Killvelane Lawrence Fanning Towlo 2h and an oven.

Barony of Clanwilliam:

Parish of Clony Pett  Jeoffry Fanning, Breanshae and Ballynuntye 1h

Barony of Slevardagh:

Parish of Bowlicke: Nicholas Fannyng, Clonamicon 1h, Jeoffrey Fanning,Esquire, Ballingarry, 3h,an oven and a kilne 10s, Thomas Fanninge 1h Ballintaggart, Thomas Fanning, Cappah, 1h

Parish of Lismalin Richard Fanninge, Mohubbur, 2h 4s, Mary Fanninge, Mohubbur, 1h 2s

Parish of Killinainvan and Modeshello: Jeoffrey Fannyng, Ballyvadlea 1 h 2s

Barony of  Owney and  Arrar:

Parish of Bourney Thomas Fanninge Lughmockerock 1h,

Parish of Killevelane (in Owny) Lawrence Fanning, Towloe, 2h and an oven, 6s.

The Hearth Money Rolls for 1665-6-7 online free at Ask About Ireland.