Fanning and Darmody Poor Relief Rate Payers 1848 Co Tipperary Ireland

Rate Relief of the Poor

“At the beginning of the Nineteenth Century in Ireland poverty was widespread. The population had more than doubled in the course of a century and had reached six and a half million. It is estimated that over two million were nearly destitute and at starvation level.

The problem was not one that could be ignored any longer by the British Government. Examination of the situation in Committee lead to a variety of remedies including public works projects, emigration and the introduction of a system of Poor Law. However the growing influx of Irish emigrants to Britain was a matter of increasing concern.

In September 1833, yet another Royal Commission was established. It was chaired by Dr. R Whately, the Protestant Archbishop of Dublin. In the following year the Poor Law Amendment Act was passed which introduced a new system of poor relief to England and Wales. The Workhouse was to be the only method of relief for the poor. At the time it was considered unsuitable for Ireland where the able-bodied were more than willing to accept any work that came their way.

Lord, John Russell the Secretary of State for the Home Department felt that the Commission had overstepped their brief. He decided to send George Nicholls one of the English Poor Law Commissioners to Ireland to investigate the situation. He was to assess whether a system based on Poor Relief, funded by a local poor rate would be effective. He was also to find out whether a workhouse system could be established. Nicholls travelled throughout Ireland. He failed to acknowledge that the needs of Ireland were substantially different to those of England. He recommended that Ireland adopt the English Workhouse System.

His recommendations were influential because in 1837 a bill, The Poor Law Act Ireland 1838,  was introduced in Parliament. The Irish Poor Relief System was to be financed by a local poor rate. It met with opposition from landlords who were perturbed about the expense of the poor rate. Tenants criticised the bill also because they were in dread of confinement to a workhouse. However, in spite of its critics the bill became law, and in July 1838 the “Act for the Effectual Relief of the Destitute Poor in Ireland” was passed.

The Poor Law Commissioners for England and Wales were to have control of the implementation of this act for Ireland. George Nicholls was appointed Commissioner and he was assisted by four assistant commissioners based in Belfast, Dublin, Cork and Limerick. The country was to be divided into Poor Law Unions based on the Irish electoral divisions. The electoral divisions were made up of townlands. Each Union was obliged to provide a workhouse for their destitute poor. A Board of Guardians was elected in each union to administer the Poor Law.  A compulsory rate was levied in each union to finance their system. The granting of relief was at the discretion of the Poor Law Guardians. Priority was given to the aged and infirm, children and people resident within the Union concerned. Boards of Guardians were elected annually on the 25th March, and only cess payers could vote. Later in the nineteenth century the Poor Law developed to encompass services such as outdoor relief, medical services for the poor, assisted migration and other social services.” From Askaboutireland

Fanning, Fannin and Darmody rate relief payers under individual parishes:

Rate Relief for the Poor of Thurles Union 10 Oct 1848 Moycarkey: John Fanning , Grague; Wm. Fanning, Grague; Patt Fanning , Maxforth; Joe Fanning , Pouldine.

Rate Relief for the Poor of the Thurles Union 1842 Templeree E.D.: Michl. Fanning- Strogue.

Rate Relief for the Poor of the Thurles Union Templemore E.D. 30 June 1846- Part 2: Wm. Fanning – Barrack St (Houses only).

Rate Relief for the Poor of Thurles Union Buolick E.D. 19 Nov 1844: Ballynastick- Thos. Fanning.

Rate Relief for the Poor of Thurles Union Ballymureen E.D. 20 Jan 1846: Parkstown – Joseph Fanning (immediate lessor).

Rate Relief for the Poor of Thurles Union: Inch E.D. 9 Dec 1845: William Fanning Lissaroon: 33 acres,3 rods no perches. Lissaroon is a townland of 296 acres 1 rood 1 perch and is covered by O.S. Maps 40 & 41 . Civil Parish of Inch, RC Parish of Drom and Inch.

Poor Law Union Thurles Moyne Electoral Division 21 Nov 1843: Connor Fanning Lisdonowley House & Land; Wm Faning Castletown House & Land; James Fanning immediate lessor Cooleeny House & Land; Margret Darmody immediate lessor Moynetemple H&L.

Poor Law Union Thurles Borrisoleigh E.D. 30 June 1846: John Fanning Rathmoyne immediate lessor; Joseph Fanning Knockahorna (Knockharney?); John Fanning Knockahorna (Knockharney?); Mary Fanning Knockahorna immediate lessor; Wm. Fanning Knockahorna immediate lessor; Danl. & Joh Fanning Knockanevin; Mary Fanning Knockanevin; Larry Fanning Corrigeen & Cullohil (Carrigeen & Cullahill?); Luke Fanning Corrigeen & Cullohil; Wm. Fanning immediate lessor Burrisoleigh; Teoffy Fanning ‘ immediate lessor Burrisoleigh; Patt Darmody Newtown.

Thurles Poor Law Union Drom E.D. 27 Jan 1846: John Fanning Killahagan; Cath. Fanning Killahagan; John Fanning Killahagan; John Fanning Killvilcorris; Joseph Fanning Killvilcorris; Thos. Fanning Killvilcorris; Denis Darmody Ballinlonty; Wm. Darmody Ballinlonty; Patt Darmody Ballinlonty; Daniel Darmody Fishmoyne; John & Jas Fanning Drum (Drom); Anastience Fanning Drum; Thos. Fanning Ballynastick.

Thurles Poor Law Union Ballymureen E.D.: Joseph Fanning Parkstown immediate lessor.

Holycross E.D 31 Jan 1842: Richd. Fanning Glenreagh; Richard Fanning Grange; Widow Fanning Grange; William Darmody Beakstown; John Darmody Beakstown; Thos. Darmody Beakstown.

Loughmoe East E.D. 31 Jan 1842: Patrick Fanning Corguilla; John Fanning Gortreagh; John Fanning Graugeafrihane; Nicholas Fanning Graugeafrihane; Thomas Fanning Graugeafrihane; John Fanning Kilerak; Widow Fanning Kilerak; John Fanning Skeagh; Patrick Fanning Skeagh.

Loughmoe West E.D. 9 Dec 1845: Michael Darmody Ballybristy; Philip Darmody Ballybristy; Edmd. Fanning Carrig of Loughmore immediate lessor; John Fanning Cloone immediate lessor; Patt Fanning Cloone; Philip Darmody Kill; Catherine Fanning Lishenataggart.

Twomileborris E.D. 31 Jan 1842: Thomas Fanning Clodfields; Widow Fanning (Mary?) Clodfields; Edmond Fanning Garraun; John Fanning Garraun; Widow Fanning (Margaret?) Garraun; Joseph Fanning Garraun; Widow Fanning (Mary?) Garraun; Michael Fanning Ballybeg; Joseph Fanning Derryhogan.

Thurles E.D. 8 Dec 1846: Commons: John Fanning (Lisnagonoge?); John Fanning (Lisnagonoge?); Garryvicleheen: Patt Fanning; Kearn’s Ln: Patt Fanning; Main St West: John Fanning; Kilrush: Thos. Fanning; Knockane: Wm. Darmody; John Fanning; Little or Upper Lewagh: Cath. Fanning; Loughtagalla: Mary Fanning; Mary Fanning; Main St: Pat Fanning; Nicholas St: John Fanning; Pike St: Edwd. Fanning; Pudding Lane: Edwd. Fanning; Edwd. Fanning; Edmd Fanning; Edwd. Fanning; John Fanning; Seskin: John Fanning; Michl Darmody; Toreen: Michl. Fanning; Turtulla: Richd. Fanning; Margt Fanning.

The above records are from  County Tipperary Ireland Genealogy.

Fannings and Darmodys in the Religious Census 1766 Co Tipperary Ireland

The largest religious census was undertaken in 1766. Each Church of Ireland minister was asked to provide a listing of all members of each denomination in his parish.

The number after the name gives the number of people in the household.

Parish of Donoghil (Tipperary South)1766 : Michael Darmody, Thomas Darmody, Walter Darmody, James Darmody

Parish of Killevinogue: Thomas Darmody 6, John Darmody 4, William Darmody 3.

Parish of Knockgraffon (Tipperary South): Mich Fanning, John Fanning

Parish of Mealiffe or Moyaliffe (6 miles S.W. from Thurles): David Fannin 6, David Fannin.

Cullen, Soloheadmore, Soloheadbeg and Cluggin. 1766: Jonathan Darmody.

United parishes of Latin, Bruis, Shronill, Corrogue, Clonpet & Cordangan -,Civil Parishes in South Tipperary. Adjoining names will be neighbours: John Ryan, Timothy Nihill, William Ryan, James Giffin [Griffin], Richard Molowny, Daniel Ryan, John Shehane [Sheehan], Daniel Ryan, William Fannin, William Pendergast, Darby Murphy, James Murphy, Thomas Glasheen, Cornelius Raverty, Malachy Dunnavane, John Hackett, Roger Corbet, Darby Reardon, Pat Comenane (Cummin], Richard Power, John Fannin, Robert Fannin.

Parish of Newchapel: John Faning.

Full lists are at Religious Census 1766 IGP

Fanning and Darmody Tithe Payers and Defaulters 1815-1837, Co Tipperary Ireland

Tithes (meaning a tenth) were levies collected in support of a church, which could be a single church or all churches of one faith. In Ireland from the 1500s to the 1800s, tithes were taxes on the agricultural system to support the Church of Ireland. Tithes made everyone cross, for many reasons. Those who were Catholic or Presbyterian resented the contribution to the established church. Land proprietors resented the impact of tithes on rents.

Tithes existed in Ireland as long ago as the 1100s, giving support to monasteries. The system that came to be resented so much was formalized in law in 1541. In 1736 legislation exempted pasture from the calculation so the burden fell upon farmers who cultivated the soil. Not all tithes went to the Church of Ireland; in 1832 a little over 15% went to “lay” (non-religious) tithe owners who acquired the right to collect tithes at the dissolution of the monasteries.

By the early 1800s resentment had become very serious. Tithes had been part of the cause of rural unrest in the late 1700s; in the 1830s, the disruptions came to be called the Tithe War. The campaign against tithes began in County Kilkenny and spread quickly to other counties. By 1833, more than half the tithes due in 22 counties had not been paid. Many landowners supported non-payment because legislation of 1823 restored pastureland to the calculation. The resistance became violent, and some deaths occurred among protestors and police.

Faced with an impossible situation, the authorities stopped trying to enforce payment and clergymen without income could apply for relief. In 1838 the tithe ceased to be paid by occupiers and landlords were levied a “rent charge.” The problem completely disappeared at the disestablishment of the Church of Ireland (1869).

The Tithe Composition Act, passed in 1823, set out the process by which the tithe was converted to a monetary payment due twice a year. Property value was assessed, meetings were held in parishes, and records made of all those who were to make the payments. These are the Tithe Applotment Books.

At the time of the Tithe War any clergyman applying for relief was required to report on the situation in his parish including the names of all those who had failed to pay–the tithe defaulters. Lists of roughly 30,000 defaulters survive. ” From Ancestry.com article by Sherry Irvine

Fanning, Fannin & Darmody Entries in the Co Tipperary Tithe Applotment Books : A-R-P = Acres, Rods & Perches (Irish) H, O, L, G = House, Office, Land, Garden.

Ballymurreen Civil Parish 1827, Thurles Poor Law Union:  Joseph Fanning, Parkstown .

Bruis Civil Parish 1832: Robert Fanning of Mount Bruis Townland.

Cordangan Civil Parish 1835: John Fannin of Lacken.

Fertiana Civil Parish 1825:  Richard Fannin, Turtulla ,  Widow Fannin, Turtulla .

Civil Parish of Inch  William Fannin, my ancestor who is buried in Ballycahill Cemetery.

Tithe Applotment Book Lissaroon Wm Fannin
Tithe Applotment Book entry for Lissaroon in Inch Parish

Civil Parish of Inch Widow Burke alias Fannin

Parish of Kilfithmone – 1823-1824 Philip Darmody,  Ballinlonty, Land 1 acre1 perch; Catherine Darmody, Land 1 acre; Catherine Darmody, House, Office, Land 10 acres, 2 perches; Philip Darmody,  House, Office, Land {21/3/27} 10 acres, 2 perches.

1826-Darby? Darmody Fishmoyne, Wm Darmody Ballinlonty, Wm Darmody Ballinlonty.

1834-1837 Daniel Darmody Kilfithmone, William Darmody Kilfithmone.

Civil Parish of Kilmurry 1834: Patrick Fanning Ballinamona Townland.

Parish of Knockgraffon 1826 : Patrick (Mary) Fanning of Loughkent, William Fanning of Donegal.

Parish of Loughmore West April 1827: Michael Darmody Ballybrista,  Denis Darmody Killahara,  Philip Darmody Killahara, Edward Fanning Carraig-Loughmore,  John Fanning Clondoty.

Loughmore East of River Suir: Edw. Darmody Graiguefrehane, Nicholas Fanning Graiguefrehane,  Michael Fanning Killenleigh.

Parish of Loughmore East otherwise Callabegs Earl of Carrick April 1825: John Fanen Gurthreagh, Patrick Fanen Skeogh, Patrick. Fanen Skeogh.

Civil Parish of Mora 1824: John Fanning of Ballanattin Upper.

Parish of Moyaliff 1837 : John Fanning, Rossmult.

Moycarky Civil Parish 1829:  Joseph Fannin, Drumgower, Lawrence Fannin, Graigue, William Fannin, Graigue,  William Fannin Kilnoe.

Civil Parish of Moyne 1828: James Fanning of Moyne Temple, James Fanning of Lisdonolly.

Civil Parish of Nenagh 1828: Ned Fanning of Spout Road.

Tithe Applotments Roscrea Civil Parish, no date given:Ml Darmody Killavilla, Ml Darmody  Killavilla, Ml Darmody Benaghmore District, Pierce Darmody, Pierce Darmody Benaghmore District , Pierce Darmody Carrick ,  Pierce Darmody Killavilla, Edwd Fanning Big Matt House District,  Patt Fanning Ballychary, Patt Fanning Streamstown.

Parish of Templeree c 1823: John Fanin Gurtadanagan

Civil Parish of Templtouhy 1815-1821: Richard Fanning of Lisdaleen

Tithe Applotment Entries 1833, Thurles Civil Parish: Casontown ? Edward Fanning, Brittas Road or North West Suburb, James Fanning Casontown, John Fanning Knockroe, John Fanning Tooreen, Michael Fanning Castle Hounie?, Michael Fanning Commons, Patk Fanning Bawntameena, Pat Fanning?, Bawntameena, Pat Fanning?

Parish of Upperchurch c 1829/30: Jeremiah Darmody Moher.

Tithe Defaulters

Civil Parish of Inch: Edmond Fannin, farmer, Townland of Buckley Islands, 1831

Widow Burke alias Fannin, farmer, Inch, 1831

Edmond Callanan & John Cullinan, Upper Dovea.

Townland of Lissaroon: John Cormac,  Patrick Banan, William Purcell, William Carroll, Patrick Ryan, William Fannin, farmer, Thomas Cormac, Edmond Purcell, John Purcell, William Purcell, Walter Purcel.

Civil Parish of Kilfithmone: Daniel Darmody 1831  Fishmoyne, William Darmody Ballinlonty 1831.

Civil Parish of Kilmurry1831, Patrick Fanning, farmer, Ballynamona .

Civil Parish of Thurles 1831: Michael Fanning, farmer, Thurles; Patrick Fanning, farmer, Thurles; Patrick Fanning, farmer, Seskin; John Fanning, farmer, Seskin; Michael Fanning, farmer, Leighmore (Loughmore?); Oliver Fanning, farmer, Race Course; Michael Fanning, farmer, Toureen.

Civil Parish of Moycarkey 1831: William Fannin farmer, Kilno; Joseph Fannin, farmer, Drumgour; William Fannin, farmer, Grague.

These  records came from The IrelandGenWeb Project and ancestry.com.

Fanning and Darmody the Cormack Petition 1858 Co Tipperary Ireland

The brothers, Daniel and William Cormack, from Loughmore Co Tipperary were publicly hanged outside Nenagh Gaol on May 11, 1858 after being found guilty of the murder of John Ellis, a land agent in Loughmore.

Daniel and William always maintained that they had played no part in the crime, and they were supported by some 2,357 people who signed a petition protesting the brothers’ innocence. The commonly held view at the time was that a local landlord had shot Ellis in a crime of passion involving Ellis’ sister, and that the Cormack brothers had been framed for murder.

Motivated by growing unease at the convictions and executions, a petition was organized for presentation to Parliament that requested the setting up of an inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the conviction of the Cormack Brothers and into the administration of criminal justice in Ireland generally.

Andrew Darmody Hollyford, Darby Darmody Hollyford, George Darmody Moyne,
John Darmody Holycross, John Darmody Clerihan, Owen Darmody Hollyford, Thomas Darmody Hollyford, Tobias Darmody Hollyford, Jeremiah Darmody signed the petition.

Fannings who signed this petition were Daniel Fanning Thurles, Jeffry Fanning Thurles, William Fanning Thurles, Edward Fanning Drom, John Fanning Drom, Thomas Fanning Drom, Edward (Edmond) Fanning Two-Mile-Borris, Edmond Fanning Two-Mile-Borris, John Fanning New Birmingham, Joseph Fanning Moycarkey, William Fanning Moyne, William Fanning Roscrea, John Fanning Borrisoleigh.

The complete Cormack Petition list.

In 1910 Daniel and William’s remains were removed from Nenagh Gaol and brought home to Loughmore in a major ceremony, with two hearses drawn by plumed horses and followed by huge crowds. After the procession arrived in the village, the Cormack brothers were buried in a large mausoleum in the local churchyard, where people still go to see the original oak coffins and the inscription proclaiming the brothers’ innocence.

Source for this list was from: http://www.censusfinder.com/irish-census-records5.htm

Recently in Loughmore Parish the community there remembered the day in 1910 when the remains of Daniel and William Cormack were brought from Nenagh Gaol to be interred in Loughmore Cemetery.

Loughmore blogspot describes the day and gives background information, newspaper clippings and photos from the day and the past.